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The 3rd Annual Audioeclectica Readers Poll Results Are In: (Winner) Best Guitar Duo - James Moore & Mitch Wayte (Winner) Best Drummer - Chris Marquard (Winner) Best Bassist - Kevin Lewis (Placed 16th) Best albums of 2016   Thanks to everyone who voted! We are all honored to be included in such an amazing list of musicians.

The 3rd Annual Audioeclectica Readers Poll Results Are In:

(Winner) Best Guitar Duo - James Moore & Mitch Wayte

(Winner) Best Drummer - Chris Marquard

(Winner) Best Bassist - Kevin Lewis

(Placed 16th) Best albums of 2016

 

Thanks to everyone who voted! We are all honored to be included in such an amazing list of musicians.





Moving Structures is a progressive instrumental band from Los Angeles, California. The four-piece, in its current form, has existed since 2012 and is comprised of Chris Marquard, James Moore, Mitch Wayte and Kevin Lewis.

But Moving Structures has been blending an aesthetic of visual and auditory art for six years and that experience truly shows on their newest concept album entitled Awake. The 12-track piece opens with stunningly beautiful piano chords which echo into oblivion on “Burial.” This transcends into gentle tinkering and dancing between single notes, whilst an intensely-growing, ominous, beautiful choir emerges. Eventually, the swirling, glorious atmosphere fades into nothingness as the next track approaches.

The very Radiohead-esque “Anthropomorphism’” continues this ethereal, atmospheric and glorious journey, but instead favors glistening guitar solos, crashing cymbals and smooth, understated bass guitar. In amongst the chaotically-quiet noise, this track challenges the listener to search deeper for other sonic treats hidden in the abyss. Synth and whirring effects seem to be hidden amongst it all, but it is hard to focus during a song so soothing.

Swirling sounds abound on the sublime “Invisible Giants.” Clinking, plinking electronic noises are caught up and lost in the cavernous well of synth. As I write this, I feel as if I’m caught underwater; calming, glitchy, glorious noise surrounds me and I’m wondering how one even begins to write something like this.

Other tracks on the album, such as “The Siege” take on a more rock-centric approach. Punchy, precise drums and looping, noodling, clean electric guitar melodies overlap one another to create an electric atmosphere while retaining the atmospheric sense of tranquility present throughout the entire album.

All in all, I cannot imagine the amount of work that went into Awake, but I can easily believe that it took two years to complete. I sense Moving Structures could achieve any musical career they desired, given their eclectic range of musical stylings.
— http://www.nomoredivision.com

Most of our readers know that I have a soft spot for elaborate packaging ~ as the majority of releases are now digital, a good physical effort really stands out. This is the case with Awake, available in two editions: a “coffin stick” USB drive and a hardback book. I’m a greedy bastard, so I bought both. The first, which one can pass from hand to hand, seems like a secret. The second is a declaration. In the old days, one would need a record company (Capitol, for example) to spring for such a thing, while these days, Shutterfly does just fine. And it’s more personal to receive such a thing, knowing that the band was involved, instead of a bunch of suits at corporate. The ambition of Moving Structures is one of their strong points, but not as strong as the music they present.

Post-rock/progressive rock concept albums used to be commonplace as well, so Awake is a bit of a throwback. The concept is simple: a burial at sea. The album begins with the actual burial (featuring the beautiful piano work of Kat Von D) and concludes with a dark ambient piece as the afterlife is reached. In the middle, it’s all rock, with riffs and rolls mimicking the ripples and rogue waves of the sea. This section travels forward and backward in time (not apparent from listening, but explained in the description), implying that the person being buried might not actually be dead. The depths are referred to in the titles and photography: “the coffin descends to the deepest part of the ocean”. In ambient tracks such as “Invisible Giants”, one can imagine the keening of beluga whales, hints of depth charges, and a sense of slow descent. The very next track, “The Siege”, yields drum rolls and guitar riffs galore, an inner struggle taking place between helpless rage and acceptance. But “Hadalpalagic” is the obvious single, nonstop energy from first to last note.

An unexpected change in timbre arrives late in the album. Electronic drums enter midway into “Seven Miles to Sleep”, shifting the band from Russian Circles territory to that of 65daysofstatic. After so much riffage, the change comes as a welcome break. More moments like this would be welcome in future efforts, an aural reflection of the band’s name.

The L.A. quartet will soon be sharing a stage with If Those Trees Could Talk, who is also promoting a new cinematic album, The Bones of a Dying World. It’s a perfect pairing: bands old and new, preserving a sound that defies the odds and offering hope in its continued existence. (Richard Allen)
— www.acloserlisten.com

This episode is part of a weekly 2-hour music podcast series featuring the best in post-rock, post-metal, indie rock and instrumental music. Streaming new tracks from Bright Like The Sun, Vy Pole, A Sudden Burst of Colour, and many more...

This episode is part of a weekly 2-hour music podcast series featuring the best in post-rock, post-metal, indie rock and instrumental music.

Streaming new tracks from Bright Like The Sun, Vy Pole, A Sudden Burst of Colour, and many more...


As we wrap up the first half of 2016, here are the best albums I’ve heard so far this year. 

As we wrap up the first half of 2016, here are the best albums I’ve heard so far this year. 


This episode is part of a weekly 2-hour music podcast series featuring the best in post-rock, post-metal, indie rock and instrumental music. Streaming new tracks from Sigur Rós, If These Trees Could Talk, Moving Structures, and many more...

This episode is part of a weekly 2-hour music podcast series featuring the best in post-rock, post-metal, indie rock and instrumental music.

Streaming new tracks from Sigur Rós, If These Trees Could Talk, Moving Structures, and many more...


A while back I made the band Moving Structures the band of the week. During that time they were in the midst of working on their debut full length. Well it’s now out and it is tremendous. When you are an instrumental band, the ability to connect with listeners and invoke feeling without vocals and lyrics is not easy, but Moving Structures are one of the few bands I’ve heard to be able to do just that and then some. There is something truly remarkable about the melodies and tones that they use to get you to feel something more than usual. The power of not having vocals makes you think and delve deeper into your senses. The twelve songs on Moving Structures’s debut Awake, take you on a journey that allows the listener to grasp their intentions all the while making it something that transcends the genre. With bits of prog, ambience, and rock, Moving Structures have released an album that can become a new blueprint for instrumental bands to learn and expand upon.
— www.audioeclectica.com